Lesson 1: The Story of the Labyrinth

In future weeks, these posts will be written by members of Apollo and Artemis, but for this very first lesson, I thought I would do the write-up!

This week, Apollo and Artemis classes have learned about the story of the labyrinth, and how it connects to the mysterious Minoan Civilisation, discovered by English Archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans.

Arthur Evans had long been obsessed with finding the civilisation behind the labyrinth story; when he uncovered the remains of a vast palace on the island of Crete – at the site known as Knossos – he named the civilisation which had made it the “Minoans” after the legendary King Minos. We talked about the story of King Minos and his son the minotaur, locked up in a labyrinth which had been built by the great designer Daedalus!

The two groups then looked at replicas of artefacts which were discovered, such as vases with octopuses painted over them, a musical instrument, a snake goddess and finally the fascinating (and as yet undeciphered) Phaistos Disk. Members of the classes had very interesting ideas about what this might be recording: some said it was a calendar, others a sundial, and others a recipe! If you’re interested in reading more about the Phaistos Disk, here is an informative article about this fascinating artefact: Phaistos Disk

Minoan art, Crete, Phaistos Disc, possibly dating to the middle or late Minoan Bronze Age (2nd millennium B.C.), Side A, Fired clay, It has 45 hieroglyphic characters engraved on both sides, along with mobile elements in spiral arrangement from the outside toward the center, Archaeological Museum of Heraklion. (Photo by Prisma/UIG/Getty Images)

We then looked at the first chapter of Telling Tales in Latin, and translated the first few lines of a story told by the Roman poet Ovid, exploring how some of the words are very similar to English words.

We will find out what happens in it next week as we progress further!

Homework:

Please learn page 15 vocabulary for a short test!

Please write a paragraph about the namesake of your class – either Apollo or Artemis – or draw a picture of the god/goddess (on separate A4 paper).

I am looking forward to seeing what you’ve written and drawn.

See you next week!

Dr R