Artemis: The Frogs (2019)

Frogs is a play about Dionysus the God of wine and his funny slave Xanthias. They go on a trip to the underworld to get a poet back from the dead because all the good poets are no longer with them. It is a comical adventure with a small modern twist. In the play they…

Apollo: The Frogs (2019)

This awe-inspiring Greek Play comes from the beginning of modern theatre. The character of Hades instils fear in the hearts of audiences but Dionysus’ frequent blunders give comic relief. A sense of the conflict between modern and old is given in the competitions between Aeschylus and Euripides, which gives a sense of reality to this…

Welcome

Welcome to the Iris Classics Centre’s blog! The Iris Classics Centre, hosted at Cheney School, is a vibrant community learning venue for people of all ages to attend events, workshops, lessons, and exhibitions. The Centre opened in October 2013, and a schedule of events is available on our website. The Centre is founded and run…

Roman Kiln

We have been very fortunate to have been donated some large pieces of a Roman Kiln which was excavated from the Churchill Hospital in Oxford in 1972. For many years, the Kiln has been housed at the Museum of Oxford in the Town Hall. The Museum of Oxford are now developing their site to create…

Animal Sounds in Ancient Greek!

In our first lesson of term, we started off by looking at some unusual looking ancient Greek words and transliterating them. Examples included: “epopoi…. poipoipoipoipoi” and “torotorotorotorotix”. You guessed at what these might be, and many of you correctly identified that they were animal sounds. They were in fact sounds made by the birds in…

A Dystopian Valentine’s Evening

On Thursday 14th February, the Iris Project held a Celebration of Dystopias, with a talk, community film viewing, exhibition, and dystopian themed refreshments! Year Eight Classics students have been exploring utopias and dystopias through the ancient Greek philosopher Plato. Plato’s most famous work is his Republic, where he outlines his thoughts on the ideal society….

Dystopian Fiction: Talk, Exhibition and Community Film Viewing

Dystopian Fiction: Talk, Exhibition and Community Film Viewing Thursday 14th February, 3.30 – 6.15pm at the Iris Classics Centre at Cheney School We are delighted to welcome Professor Greg Claeys, lecturer from Royal Holloway University, and author of “Dystopias: A Natural History” to speak at the Classics Centre about Dystopian Fiction. He will speak between…

Utopia or Dystopia: Imagined Societies from 380 BC to 1984

In today’s lesson, we started by looking at three Greek words: “ou”, dys-” and “topos”. Some of you spotted that when joining them together, it created the words “utopia” and “dystopia”. “topos” means a “place”, “dys” is a negative prefix, being “bad”, and “ou”, more surprisingly, means “no”. So a “utopia” literally means “no place”,…

Empedocles and a Klepsydra

In today’s lessons, we started with two ancient Greek words, “κλέπτω” and “ῠ̔́δωρ“. I asked you to transliterate them and then we talked about what they might mean. You were quick to guess the first, “I steal”, and link it to ‘kleptomaniac’, and some of you spotted the similarity to ‘hydrate’ for “ῠ̔́δωρ“, leading to…

Introducing the Presocratics

We started back this term on a completely new module! After some warm-up Latin verbs and nouns, I explained that we were leaving behind the Trojan War and Dark Ages, and skipping forward in time to around the sixth century BC. Around this time, a group of early thinkers, known as the Presocratics, emerged, and…